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Marijuana Addiction Treatment in Florida | Olympic Behavioral Health

Marijuana Addiction Treatment in West Palm Beach, FL

Is Marijuana Addictive?

Yes, people can get addicted to marijuana. While it is not as addictive as other substances, such as opioids or alcohol, it is still possible to develop a dependence on marijuana.

Marijuana use can lead to changes in the brain’s reward system, resulting in a pattern of compulsive use and difficulty controlling use despite negative consequences. Regular marijuana use can lead to tolerance, where an individual needs more of the substance to achieve the desired effects and withdrawal symptoms when use is discontinued.

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), around 9% of people who use marijuana will become addicted to it. This number increases to 17% for people who start using marijuana in their teens. Genetics, environment, and mental health conditions may increase the risk of addiction.

People can get addicted to marijuana due to psychological, genetic, environmental, and social factors.

While not everyone who uses marijuana becomes addicted to it, repeated use of the drug can lead to changes in the brain that contribute to the development of addiction.

Here are some of the ways that people may become addicted to marijuana:

  • Regular use: Regular use of marijuana can lead to tolerance, where more of the drug is needed to achieve the same effects. This can lead to increased use and the development of dependence.
  • Psychological factors: Those who struggle with mental health conditions such as depression or anxiety may be more likely to use marijuana to cope with their symptoms. This can lead to a pattern of compulsive use and addiction.
  • Genetics: Some people may be more genetically predisposed to addiction and more likely to become addicted to marijuana.
  • Environment: Those who grow up in households where substance use is normalized or who are exposed to drug use in their communities may be more likely to use marijuana and develop an addiction.
  • Social factors: Peer pressure and social norms can also contribute to the development of addiction. Using marijuana to fit in with peers or feel part of a social group may make them more likely to become addicted.

Addiction is a complex disease that affects everyone differently. It can be challenging to predict who will develop a marijuana addiction. If you or someone you know is over-reliant on marijuana, talk to a professional healthcare provider.

Is Marijuana a Gateway Drug?

The idea that marijuana is a “gateway drug” has been debated for many years. While some evidence suggests that marijuana use can increase the likelihood of using other drugs, the concept of marijuana as a “gateway drug” is not entirely accurate.

Research shows that the majority of people who use marijuana do not go on to use other drugs. However, early exposure to drugs, including marijuana, can increase the likelihood of experimenting with different substances later in life.

Factors that may increase the likelihood of using other drugs include genetics, environment, and mental health conditions. Growing up in households where substance use is normalized or exposure to drug use in their communities may mean they’re increasingly likely to use other drugs besides marijuana.

The criminalization of marijuana may contribute to its status as a “gateway drug.”

When people purchase marijuana from illegal sources, they may be exposed to other illicit substances and criminal activity, increasing the likelihood of using other drugs.

The idea of marijuana as a “gateway drug” is inaccurate. Some research suggests that early exposure to drugs, including marijuana, can increase the likelihood of experimenting with other substances later in life. Seek medical support from a qualified healthcare provider if you or someone you know is wrestling with substance use.

Marijuana Addiction Treatment in Florida

Marijuana Addiction Treatment

Olympic Behavioral Health is your resource for overcoming cannabis dependence and reclaiming your life. We offer evidence-based treatment options, including Partial Hospitalization Program (PHP) and Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP), for those struggling with a reliance on marijuana use. Our team understands the complex relationship between mental health conditions and substance use. We also provide specialized care for those dealing with depression, anxiety, and trauma.


Marijuana use can often be a way to cope with underlying mental health issues.

Depression can lead to hopelessness and a lack of motivation, making marijuana an appealing option for temporary relief. Similarly, anxiety can cause a constant sense of unease and worry, making the calming effects of marijuana seem like an attractive solution. Trauma can also lead to using marijuana as a coping mechanism, numbing the pain and allowing those affected to escape reality.

At Olympic Behavioral Health in West Palm Beach, FL, we believe in finding alternative coping mechanisms that can be used instead of marijuana to resolve these dual diagnoses. These alternatives include cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), meditation, yoga, exercise, and group therapy. Our therapists utilize a combination of treatments to help clients learn healthier ways to manage their mental health and cravings for marijuana.

Our addiction treatment programs utilize evidence-based practices such as cognitive-behavioral therapy, contingency management, and motivational interviewing. These therapies help to identify triggers for marijuana use and develop coping skills to manage cravings. Additionally, our programs provide education on the impact of marijuana on the body and mind and support in developing a relapse prevention plan.

At Olympic Behavioral Health, we are committed to helping our clients overcome marijuana use and the underlying mental health conditions that contribute to it. With our treatment plans, specialized care, and evidence-based therapies, we can help you on your journey to recovery. Contact us today to take the first step towards a healthier, happier life.

The Top 3 Reasons People Use Marijuana?

Based on research and surveys, the top 3 reasons people use marijuana are:

  • Recreational purposes: Some people use marijuana for its psychoactive effects, such as relaxation, euphoria, and altered perception. They may use it to socialize, enhance their mood, or have a good time.
  • Medical purposes: Marijuana has been legalized for medical use in some states and countries, as it may have therapeutic benefits for conditions such as chronic pain, anxiety, epilepsy, and cancer-related symptoms.
  • Coping mechanism: Some use marijuana to cope with stress, trauma, or mental health conditions such as depression and anxiety. While it may provide temporary relief, long-term use may worsen these conditions.

What is the Difference Between Marijuana, Edibles, and CBD?

Marijuana, edibles, and CBD are all derived from the cannabis plant, but they differ in chemical composition, effects, and legal status.

  • Marijuana, also known as cannabis or weed, contains the psychoactive compound tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is responsible for the “high” associated with marijuana use. Marijuana can be smoked, vaporized, or consumed in various forms, including edibles, tinctures, and oils. It is still illegal under federal law in states. Although most have legalized its use for medical or recreational purposes.
  • Edibles are food products that contain THC, the psychoactive compound found in marijuana. They can come in various forms, such as gummies, chocolates, or baked goods, and are consumed orally. Edibles can have a delayed onset of effects, as they need to be digested before the THC is absorbed into the bloodstream. They can be more potent than smoking or vaporizing marijuana, and the effects can last longer.
  • CBD (cannabidiol) is another compound found in the cannabis plant. It is non-psychoactive and does not produce a “high.” CBD can be derived from marijuana or hemp and is often used for medicinal purposes, such as to alleviate pain, reduce anxiety, or improve sleep. It can be consumed in various forms, including oils, tinctures, and edibles. CBD products are legal in many states as long as they contain less than 0.3% THC.

While marijuana, edibles, and CBD are all derived from the cannabis plant, their chemical composition, effects, and legal status differ.

Know the differences between these substances before consuming them, and follow the laws and regulations in your area regarding their use.

How Can I Stop Using Marijuana?

There are several mental health-related alternatives to recreational marijuana that can be explored. These alternatives include:

  • Exercise: Exercise can help reduce stress, anxiety, and depression. It releases endorphins, which can improve mood and promote a sense of well-being. Exercise can also help to develop a healthy routine and cope with cravings.
  • Mindfulness and meditation: Mindfulness and meditation practices can help to develop an awareness of thoughts and emotions. It can also promote relaxation, reduce stress, and improve overall well-being.
  • Therapy: Various types of treatment, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy, dialectical behavior therapy, and mindfulness-based therapy, can help develop healthy coping mechanisms, manage cravings, and improve mental health. Therapy can also address underlying issues that may be contributing to substance use.
  • Creative activities: Engaging in creative activities such as music, art, or writing can be a way to express emotions and reduce stress. These activities can also promote a sense of accomplishment and enjoyment.

These alternatives can be helpful but may not be sufficient for everyone. If you’re struggling with mental health conditions or substance use, get professional assistance from a licensed healthcare provider.

Non-Addictive Alternatives to Medical Marijuana

Marijuana Addiction Treatment

There are several non-addictive therapeutic alternatives to marijuana used for pain relief. Some of these alternatives include:

  • Acupuncture is a traditional Chinese medicine technique that involves the insertion of thin needles into the skin at specific points. It can be effective in reducing pain and inflammation.
  • Physical therapy can help alleviate pain through exercises and stretches that improve the range of motion and reduce muscle tension. It can also help develop healthy habits and prevent further injuries.
  • Massage therapy can help reduce pain and muscle tension, promote relaxation, and improve overall well-being.
  • Certain herbs and supplements, such as turmeric, ginger, and omega-3 fatty acids, can help reduce inflammation and pain. Always talk to a healthcare provider before taking any supplements.
  • Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) therapy involves using a small device that sends electrical impulses to the affected area. It can help alleviate pain by stimulating the nerves and blocking pain signals.

These alternatives may only be effective for some. Consult a healthcare provider to determine the best course of treatment.

EMDR Treats Marijuana Use for Trauma

EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) is a psychotherapy approach often used to treat trauma and PTSD. EMDR can also help treat co-occurring depression and trauma, which can contribute to the use of marijuana.

EMDR therapy addresses the underlying trauma contributing to depression and substance use. It uses a combination of cognitive-behavioral therapy, exposure therapy, and bilateral stimulation to help people process traumatic memories and develop healthier coping mechanisms.

For those who use marijuana to cope with their depression and trauma, EMDR therapy can help address the root causes of their substance use. They identify triggers for their substance use, develop coping skills to manage cravings, and reduce the symptoms of depression and anxiety.

EMDR therapy can also help people reframe their experiences and develop a positive outlook on their future. It can create a sense of control over their lives and reduce the feeling of helplessness that can contribute to substance use.

EMDR therapy can effectively treat co-occurring depression, trauma, and substance use. It can help to process traumatic memories, develop healthier coping mechanisms, and reduce the symptoms of depression and anxiety. If you are battling with co-occurring depression, trauma, and substance use, EMDR therapy may be a beneficial treatment option to consider.

Neurofeedback Therapy Treats Marijuana Use Triggers

Opioid Addiction Treatment

Neurofeedback therapy is a non-invasive biofeedback therapy that aims to train the brain to regulate its activity and function more efficiently. While research on the effectiveness of neurofeedback therapy for marijuana addiction is limited, some studies suggest that it may be a promising treatment option for ending reliance on marijuana usage.

Neurofeedback therapy can help treat marijuana addiction by targeting specific brain areas that may be affected by substance use. This therapy can help develop self-regulation skills and improve cognitive functioning, reducing the urge to use marijuana.

People identify triggers for their substance use and develop healthier coping mechanisms. Neurofeedback therapy can help them develop greater control over their substance use by training the brain to regulate its activity.

While neurofeedback therapy can effectively end reliance on marijuana usage, it is not a standalone treatment option. It is used in conjunction with other forms of therapy to address the underlying causes of substance use.

Behavioral Therapies That Help to Quit Marijuana

Several effective therapies and treatments can help to end a reliance on marijuana. These include:

  • Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT): CBT is a type of therapy that identifies negative thought patterns and develop healthier coping mechanisms. It can address the underlying causes of substance use and reduce the urge to use marijuana.
  • Motivational interviewing (MI): MI is a type of therapy that pinpoints motivations for change and develops a behavior change plan. It can address ambivalence and resistance to treatment, which can be common in substance use.
  • Contingency management (CM): CM is a therapy that uses positive reinforcement to encourage and reward abstinence from marijuana use. It can be effective in reducing substance use and promoting abstinence.
  • 12-step programs: 12-step programs, such as Marijuana Anonymous, provide support and accountability for people who want to quit using marijuana. They involve a set of principles and practices that aid in developing a sense of community, hope, and recovery.
  • Family therapy: Family therapy can assist in addressing substance use issues and strengthen family relationships. It can help them develop healthy communication skills, cope with stress, and manage any family dynamics contributing to substance use.
  • Group therapy: Group therapy can offer a sense of community and support as they work to end their reliance on marijuana. They learn to develop healthy coping mechanisms, build social skills, and gain insight into substance use.
  • Trauma-focused therapy: Trauma-focused therapy, such as EMDR or trauma-focused CBT, address trauma and its relationship to substance use. Traumatic memories are processed, allowing them to develop healthier coping mechanisms.

The most effective treatment for ending marijuana use focuses on each client’s needs and circumstances. A combination of therapies and treatments may be necessary to achieve lasting recovery. Find professional care from a licensed healthcare provider to determine the best course of treatment for you.

Is marijuana legal in the US, according to federal law?

Under federal law in the United States, marijuana is classified as a Schedule I drug, meaning it is illegal to possess, use, distribute, or cultivate marijuana. This is based on the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) of 1970, which places marijuana in the same category as heroin and LSD, and states that it has a high potential for abuse and no accepted medical use.

However, despite federal law, many states have legalized marijuana for medical and/or recreational use within their borders. Some states have decriminalized the possession of small amounts of marijuana. This has led to a complex legal landscape in the United States, where marijuana is illegal at the federal level but legal for some uses in many states.

Even in states where marijuana is legal, there are still restrictions and regulations around its use, such as age restrictions, possession limits, and restrictions on public use. Follow the laws and regulations in your area regarding the use of marijuana to avoid legal consequences.

Medical Marijuana Use

Legalized Marijuana

Legalized marijuana use refers to the legal permission to possess, use, and/or cultivate marijuana for medical or recreational purposes per the laws and regulations of a state. The legalization of marijuana use has become a topic of debate in many states, with proponents citing its potential medical benefits and the economic benefits of taxing and regulating its use. In contrast, opponents cite concerns over possible adverse health effects and the risks associated with drug use.

In some states, marijuana has been legalized for medical use, with patients able to obtain marijuana with a prescription from a licensed healthcare provider. In other states, marijuana has been legalized for recreational use, with individuals over a certain age able to purchase and possess a certain amount of marijuana for personal use.

Even in areas where marijuana use has been legalized, there are still restrictions and regulations around its use, such as age restrictions, possession limits, and restrictions on public use. Follow the laws and regulations in your area regarding the use of marijuana to avoid legal consequences.

Here is a list of the legal status of marijuana use for each state.(1)

StateMedicinalLegal Status
AlabamaYesFully Illegal
AlaskaYesFully Legal
ArizonaYesFully Legal
ArkansasYesMixed
CaliforniaYesFully Legal
ColoradoYesFully Legal
ConnecticutYesMixed
DelawareYesMixed
District of ColumbiaYesFully Legal
FloridaYesMixed
GeorgiaYesMixed
HawaiiYesMixed
IdahoYesFully Illegal
IllinoisYesFully Legal
IndianaYesMixed
IowaYesMixed
KansasYesMixed
KentuckyYesMixed
LouisianaYesMixed
MaineYesFully Legal
MarylandYesMixed
MassachusettsYesFully Legal
MichiganYesFully Legal
MinnesotaYesMixed
MississippiYesMixed
 
StateMedicinalLegal Status
MissouriYesMixed
MontanaYesFully Legal
NebraskaYesMixed
NevadaYesFully Legal
New HampshireYesMixed
New JerseyYesFully Legal
New MexicoYesMixed
New YorkYesMixed
North CarolinaYesMixed
North DakotaYesMixed
OhioYesMixed
OklahomaYesMixed
OregonYesFully Legal
PennsylvaniaYesMixed
Rhode IslandYesMixed
South CarolinaYesFully Illegal
South DakotaYesFully Illegal
TennesseeYesFully Illegal
TexasYesMixed
UtahYesMixed
VermontYesFully Legal
VirginiaYesFully Legal
WashingtonYesFully Legal
West VirginiaYesMixed
WisconsinYesMixed
WyomingYesFully Illegal

Experience the life-changing potential of specialized cannabis support at Olympic Behavioral Health. With experienced guidance, our experts can equip you or your loved one with knowledge and resources to overcome conflicts associated with marijuana use. Take that first step towards wellness by visiting us online or giving (833) 826-9533 a call today!

(1) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_cannabis_by_U.S._jurisdiction

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